theredshoes:

The Nighthawk stake was used by Buffy, Xander, and Faith in the critically acclaimed Buffy the Vampire Slayer to fight off forces of darkness. The television show, based on the adventures of young slayer Buffy Summers, played by Sarah Michelle Gellar, won three Emmy awards and brought the then little-known WB television network into the light.

Nighthawk stake, 1998. Courtesy of Wesley Cannon.

Photo courtesy of EMP staff.

via

theredshoes:

The Nighthawk stake was used by Buffy, Xander, and Faith in the critically acclaimed Buffy the Vampire Slayer to fight off forces of darkness. The television show, based on the adventures of young slayer Buffy Summers, played by Sarah Michelle Gellar, won three Emmy awards and brought the then little-known WB television network into the light.

Nighthawk stake, 1998. Courtesy of Wesley Cannon.

Photo courtesy of EMP staff.

via

There is a beauty in the world, though it’s harsher than we expect it to be.

Michael Cunningham, The Hours (via leslieseuffert)

drschultzs:

TROIS COULEURS TRILOGY [picspam collab with danielcraigs]

(Bleu, Blanc, + Rouge) Directed by Krzysztof Kieslowski, 1993-1994

Now I have only one thing left to do: nothing. I don’t want any belongings, any memories. No friends, no love. Those are all traps.”

(Source: tomhazeldine)

What a terrible mistake to let go of something wonderful for something real.

Miranda July, No One Belongs Here More Than You

(Source: larmoyante)

sandundsiebdas:

Actress Gemma Arterton on a break during the filming of ‘Byzantium’. She went out to the balcony for a smoke and forgot to clean the fake blood off her face. Awesome.

sandundsiebdas:

Actress Gemma Arterton on a break during the filming of ‘Byzantium’. She went out to the balcony for a smoke and forgot to clean the fake blood off her face. Awesome.

strangeremains:

Skull, found in France, with a knife still embedded it it.  The skull belonged to a Roman solider who died during the Gallic Wars, ca. 52BC. It was on display at the Museo Rocsen in Argentina.  

strangeremains:

Skull, found in France, with a knife still embedded it it.  The skull belonged to a Roman solider who died during the Gallic Wars, ca. 52BC. It was on display at the Museo Rocsen in Argentina.  

(Source: derwiduhudar)

All of this is typical girl-fear. Once you realize that The Exorcist is, essentially, the story of a 12-year-old who starts cussing, masturbating, and disobeying her mother—in other words, going through puberty—it becomes apparent to the feminist-minded viewer why two adult men are called in to slap her around for much of the third act. People are convinced that something spooky is going on with girls; that, once they reach a certain age, they lose their adorable innocence and start tapping into something powerful and forbidden. Little girls are sugar and spice, but women are just plain scary. And the moment a girl becomes a woman is the moment you fear her most. Which explains why the culture keeps telling this story.

Rookie, The Season of the Witch

For readings on the correlation in horror between puberty and the monstrous, see:

(Source: erikawithac)

likeafieldmouse:

The First Photograph of a Human Being

"This photograph of Boulevard du Temple in Paris was made in 1838 by Louis Daguerre, the brilliant guy who invented the daguerreotype process of photography.

Aside from its distinction of being a super early photograph, it’s also the first photograph to ever include a human being.

Because the image required an exposure time of over ten minutes, all the people, carriages, and other moving things disappear from the scene. However, in the bottom left hand corner is a man who just so happened to stay somewhat still during the shot — he was having his shoes shined.”

When you live in the dark for so long, you begin to love it. And it loves you back, and isn’t that the point? You think, the face turns to the shadows, and just as well. It accepts, it heals, it allows.



But it also devours.

Carver, Raymond. Late Fragment.
(via wordsnquotes)

viviensleigh:

The Uninvited (1944)

tomb999999:

a reverse from [x]

tomb999999:

a reverse from [x]

'Do what you love' is a secret handshake of the privileged and a worldview that disguises its elitism as noble self-betterment. According to this way of thinking, labor is not something one does for compensation but is an act of love. If profit doesn’t happen to follow, presumably it is because the worker’s passion and determination were insufficient. Its real achievement is making workers believe their labor serves the self and not the marketplace.

emmanuelle-beart:

She wore blue velvet, bluer than velvet was the night, softer than satin was the light from the stars.

Emily Blunt as Dorothy Vallens in Blue Velvet (1986).