ageofdestruction:

chorus: Clouds on Mars, photographed by Mars Express, 20th December 2005.
Around 70°S 192°E on the southern Terra Sirenum; this composite is about 50 by 75km. Charlier Crater is partially seen at top. The clouds might be dust picked from the dark region below, but I’m not sure.
Composite of 8 images: 3 (red, green, and blue light) for colour, and 5 monochromatic (ish) in sequence for motion. The colours are probably more suggestive than naturalistic.
Image credit: ESA. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.

ageofdestruction:

chorus: Clouds on Mars, photographed by Mars Express, 20th December 2005.

Around 70°S 192°E on the southern Terra Sirenum; this composite is about 50 by 75km. Charlier Crater is partially seen at top. The clouds might be dust picked from the dark region below, but I’m not sure.

Composite of 8 images: 3 (red, green, and blue light) for colour, and 5 monochromatic (ish) in sequence for motion. The colours are probably more suggestive than naturalistic.

Image credit: ESA. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.

I wish I could live underwater. Maybe then my skin would absorb the sea’s consoling silence.

Cristina Garcia (via fables-of-the-reconstruction)
Liv Tyler photographed by Regan Cameron for Jane magazine, 2003.

Liv Tyler photographed by Regan Cameron for Jane magazine, 2003.

malformalady:

The black lipped oyster, pinctada margaritifera, produces the saltwater gems known as Tahitian black pearls. They are produced in the warm waters of French Polynesia.P. margaritifera is the only mollusk that produces these pearls, and they do so in places besides Tahiti. So, the name, Tahitian black pearls, is a bit misleading. For the oyster to thrive and for production to occur, the major requirement is that the water be warm. That being so, Tahitian black pearls can be found also in the Philippines, Hawaii, Fiji, Panama, and the Gulf of Mexico. But the “Tahitian” name sticks, no matter where p. margaritifera conducts its production.

malformalady:

The black lipped oyster, pinctada margaritifera, produces the saltwater gems known as Tahitian black pearls. They are produced in the warm waters of French Polynesia.P. margaritifera is the only mollusk that produces these pearls, and they do so in places besides Tahiti. So, the name, Tahitian black pearls, is a bit misleading. For the oyster to thrive and for production to occur, the major requirement is that the water be warm. That being so, Tahitian black pearls can be found also in the Philippines, Hawaii, Fiji, Panama, and the Gulf of Mexico. But the “Tahitian” name sticks, no matter where p. margaritifera conducts its production.

I argue that, in what are called “Western” societies, the attempt to create a transhistorical and transcultural concept of religion that is essentially prone to violence is one of the foundational legitimating myths of the liberal nation-state. The myth of religious violence helps to construct and marginalize a religious Other, prone to fanaticism, to contrast with the rational, peace-making, secular subject. This myth can be and is used in domestic politics to legitimate the marginalization of certain types of practices and groups labeled religious, while underwriting the nation-state’s monopoly on its citizens’ willingness to sacrifice and kill. In foreign policy, the myth of religious violence serves to cast nonsecular social orders, especially Muslim societies, in the role of villain. They have not yet learned to remove their dangerous influence of religion from political life. Their violence is therefore irrational and fanatical. Our violence, being secular, is rational, peace-making, and sometimes regrettably necessary to contain their violence. We find ourselves obliged to bomb them into liberal democracy.

William T. Cavanaugh, The Myth of Religious Violence (via thymoss)

(Source: readyokaygo)

enochliew:

Pocket Printer by Zuta Labs

Not only a portable design, but able to print on any size page.

pussylequeer:

Milla Jovovich in Chaplin

We now know that 24 hours without sleep, or a week of sleeping four or five hours a night induces an impairment equivalent to a blood alcohol level of .1 percent. We would never say, ‘This person is a great worker! He’s drunk all the time!’ yet we continue to celebrate people who sacrifice sleep for work.

(Source: mrs-brisby)

mucholderthen:

Evaporitic rock formations in the Realmonte salt mines
300 feet below sea level in Sicily

  1. 45 Miles Of Tunnels [Giuseppe Fallica (500px Art)]
  2. La miniera di sale (Realmonte-AG) (Texture- by Alberto [JuzaPhoto])
  3. Miniera di Salgemma Realmonte [photo by Emanuela de Leva Vacca]

These salt deposits were formed during the “Messinian Salinity Crisis”, a geological event during which the Mediterranean Sea was cut off from the Atlantic Ocean and dried up (or mostly dried up), creating massive deposits of previously dissolved salts. This occurred at the end of the Messinian age of the Miocene epoch, from 5.96 to 5.33 million years ago, ending when the Atlantic again flowed into the basin.

Stop telling women that we should find ourselves beautiful and that we should love ourselves when you are standing right there, judging us on how our knees look in short skirts and how prominent our boobs are in a sweater and how much makeup we are or are not wearing.

Instead of us working harder on “love your body” and “find your inner beauty”, the rest of the world should be working harder on “stop telling women their bodies are a shameful place to live but that if they’re strong enough, they will learn to embrace that shame.”

This is my body. It’s not “beautiful”. I don’t “love it”. I don’t have to. I don’t have to have any strong feelings about my body. And whatever feelings I do have are not somehow invalid if they’re not glowing reviews.

Elyse Mofo, “Don’t Tell Me to Love My Body”  (via shy-fawn)

(Source: nightrevelations)

Audrey Hepburn in Sabrina (1954).

(Source: fredastairemovies)

Gina Lollobrigida, 1949,
Gina Lollobrigida, 1949,

The Berlin Wall made news every day. From morning till night we read saw, heard: the Wall of Shame, the Wall of Infamy, the Iron Curtain…

In the end, a wall which deserved to fall, fell. But other walls sprouted and continue sprouting across the world. Though they are much larger than the one in Berlin, we rarely hear of them.

Little is said about the wall the United States is building along the Mexican border, and less is said about the barbed-wire barriers surrounding the Spanish enclaves of Ceuta and Melilla on the African coast.

Practically nothing is said about the West Bank Wall, which perpetuates the Israeli occupation of Palestinian lands and will be fifteen times longer than the Berlin Wall. And nothing, nothing at all, is said about the Morocco Wall, which perpetuates the seizure of the Saharan homeland by the Kingdom of Morocco, and is sixty times the length of the Berlin Wall.

Why are some walls so loud and others mute?

Eduardo Galeano in Mirrors: Stories of Almost Everyone  (via penultimateairbender)

because some walls are for white people

(via audscratprophetlilith)

(Source: ihateyolandasaldivar)

Lucy Liu"Brush with Fame" [x]

(Source: lucyliued)